Topic: Varriable Geometry Turbo  (Read 253 times)

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Offline Kota

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Varriable Geometry Turbo
« on: 06/18/17 06:44AM »
I have always been dreaming of building a real performance engine along with dreaming of boosted bikes with electronic actuators controlling the interchangeable wing (different wings with different angle of attack creating different types of down force or lift depending on your style :27:  Of course all of this would have to be networking with ECU that can be programmable for the angle of attack of the wing being used .  (Its a pipe dream for me to build a bike of this caliber for I don't even have a garage let alone a shop with proper tools, or the schooling of being able to write the proper program so the ECU and the wings are networking). I know I am not the only one thinking about this. I mean its 2017. I know there is at least one other person entertaining the idea of a Variable Geometry Turbocharged bike. I mean yea Kawasaki has the H2 and H2r with its fixed wings and supercharged engine but it's so Neanderthal for the technology we have available. Supercharged engine will reach it's point of adiabatic efficiency sooner than turbocharged. Not to mention supercharging it "takes away raw power" I get why turbo's are not too popular for bikes because of the sudden boost. But with VGT set up, along with interchangeable mechanical wing with different degree of angles of attack attached to an actuator that is networking with the ECU will make the bike easier to cut through the air and with VCT give it that "smooth useable torque throughout the RPM". This is OCMoto, I don't expect much but if there is anyone who has been playing with the idea of doing something radical PM me.

I am not making any promises but I just may be able to actually get your cylinder head professionally flow tested and get some real CFM numbers.....and than do my research to which VGT will give it that smooth useable power through out the RPM. I want to do this, simply because I am curious to know how much CFM do different motorcycle heads flow for future projects....that I may or may not do :26:

Offline MurdaJ

Re: Varriable Geometry Turbo
« Reply #1 on: 06/18/17 11:59AM »
Turbos are gay
I am not a superstitious native

Offline Rogue

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Re: Varriable Geometry Turbo
« Reply #2 on: 06/18/17 05:45PM »
Today's modern turbochargers currently use a "twin-scroll" design.

Here's a good explanation of how it works:  http://dsportmag.com/the-tech/twin-scroll-vs-single-scroll-turbo-test-the-great-divide/

I believe this method pretty much does what you're trying to dream up for a small engine.  But your variable vane turbo already exists and is in use:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable-geometry_turbocharger

GM's newest diesel engines will use a variable vane turbocharger.
http://media.chevrolet.com/media/us/en/chevrolet/home.detail.html/content/Pages/news/us/en/2016/sep/0929-duramax-chevrolet.html

Both of the above attempt to eliminate the drawbacks of turbocharged engines.  The Twin Scroll ones are the norm today in modern cars because they appear to work better on smaller engines.  Basically you get low end torque early, and it holds on to that torque peak longer.

At the end of the day though, power and efficiency for the given displacement and weight class is how performance machines are judged.  The question that will be asked is, can your turbo beat the current cream of the crop liter bikes with 200 bhp?  Perhaps if you can create a bolt on turbocharger set up for aircooled V-twin cruisers (they already exist but not exactly bolt on), you'll have something.  I believe the complex plumbing, added weight, and higher costs of a turbocharger negates its use on motorcycles when it's so much easier to just stuff a powerful V-twin or inline four. 

But yeah.  Turbo's are way more exciting.  And they are so much easier to tune for big horsepower gains.  Open up that intake and exhaust, tune it, and boom!  It's an easy 50+ horsepower gain!  You just cant get that in any normally aspirated engine with just a CAI and cat back exhaust and a 91 octane tune.  There are tons of vehicles out there with twin turbo set ups now pushing 700-1000 horsepower on street driven vehicles.
 

Offline thepretender

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Re: Varriable Geometry Turbo
« Reply #3 on: 06/18/17 06:00PM »
"The ride IS the destination..." OOTV

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Offline Throttle Chopper

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Re: Varriable Geometry Turbo
« Reply #4 on: 06/18/17 09:46PM »
What do you mean by "angle of attack", and when would you ever want lift on a motorcycle other than motocross? :36:

As for turbocharging, they make sense in a car/truck cause they can produce massive, tunable power efficiently and they have plenty of room to plumb the necessities of making power/boost with an intercooler.  You might find luck experimenting with maximizing airflow by simply porting and polishing a head and intake, grinding away casting marks and the like.  There are plenty of books/videos on that subject, and no doubt, race engine builders have tried everything under the sun. 
Every day is ride to work day!

Offline Brando

Re: Varriable Geometry Turbo
« Reply #5 on: 06/20/17 11:04AM »
Forced induction also increases the volumetric efficiency of an internal combustion engine. The way [most] engines are built and designed today for forced induction they are pretty reliable - excluding Fiats imho. If there were no gains to be had, why would the H2R have gone that route? Limited displacement but the need for more and linear power.

Imagine a world where the emissions controls are becoming ever-more controlling and restrictive. To hit emissions regulations, fuel-economy requirements, and use higher Ethanol blends, soon forced induction will be even more common-place. Maybe not yet on motorcycles.

What do you mean by "angle of attack", and when would you ever want lift on a motorcycle other than motocross? :36:

As for turbocharging, they make sense in a car/truck cause they can produce massive, tunable power efficiently and they have plenty of room to plumb the necessities of making power/boost with an intercooler.  You might find luck experimenting with maximizing airflow by simply porting and polishing a head and intake, grinding away casting marks and the like.  There are plenty of books/videos on that subject, and no doubt, race engine builders have tried everything under the sun.

 

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