Topic: US Moto Industry news...  (Read 1259 times)

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Offline r0ckrat

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US Moto Industry news...
« on: 01/17/18 01:13PM »
http://globalmoto.media/us-motorcycle-industry.htm

US Motorcycle Industry's Woes - Part 1

Evaluation & Analysis
The US motorcycle market is very different from all other markets in the world. In India for example they sell 17M bikes a year. It's no wonder European brands are flocking there. We are a country of 320M and last year we purchased 17M new cars, SUVs and pickups. However, in the same year we bought only 470K motorcycles, including scooters and three-wheel vehicles (down from over a million units in '07). The US moto market has contracted or shrunk by about 60% in 10 years.

Read the rest at the link.

Offline breakdirt916

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #1 on: 01/17/18 02:33PM »
Jai India!!!!

my parents just came back...my Mom complained that it's so dirty out there...quality of roads...traffic...I think I'd have quite a bit of fun on a dual sport out there LOLOL
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Offline Snapshot

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #2 on: 01/17/18 02:41PM »
That's an interesting read. 

Digital entertainment and marketing are having their effect.  Now that most of us have given the various medias charge of our culture I guess we'll get what they think is good for them.  Us?  Not so much.

I plan to keep riding.  I'll try to lose some weight, too.

Ride on,

J~
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Offline calamari

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #3 on: 01/17/18 03:38PM »
Decent article, I always resent authors who praise the boomers for everything then blame the younger generations for the shortcomings, things change, markets change, don't blame the gameboys.
Also at no point is the recession mentioned in this article and I think that had a lot to due with the declining sales in the later 2000's.
Not just the lack of growth of the economy or stagnant wages, but the atmosphere of giving credit to anyone was responsible for inflating those sales numbers in the early 2000's.


Offline Andy

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #4 on: 01/17/18 05:14PM »
Decent article, I always resent authors who praise the boomers for everything then blame the younger generations for the shortcomings, things change, markets change, don't blame the gameboys.
Also at no point is the recession mentioned in this article and I think that had a lot to due with the declining sales in the later 2000's.
Not just the lack of growth of the economy or stagnant wages, but the atmosphere of giving credit to anyone was responsible for inflating those sales numbers in the early 2000's.

was easy to buy a bike when you could use your house as an ATM.  $30k harley?  what's that over 30 years?


Quote
The US moto market is shrinking and with new generations showing little interest in anything other than gadgets and video games it wouldn't take Nostradamus to see where our future is heading.

I think what this, and every other article I've read fails to recognize is that absolute explosion of used sales. I mean 10-12 years ago you could find decent used bikes for pretty cheap.  Now?  Some POS 80's japanese USDM bike that doesn't run costs $1k.  What they fail to recognize is that younger adults don't NOT want bikes, they can't afford them.  They have crippling student loan debt, upwards and sometimes over $1,000/month.  Video games are cheap!

What kind of fun purchases are you making when wages have been suppressed for 30 years and you're barely scraping by with 3 roommates?

stop blaming consumers and start blaming manufacturers who have failed to respond to an evolving market place.

Offline r0ckrat

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #5 on: 01/18/18 04:09PM »
Here's another article on the topic...

http://www.motorcycle.com/features/give-a-shift-trying-to-help-save-the-motorcycle-industry.html

Give A Shift: Trying To Help Save The Motorcycle Industry
Kickstarting a needed conversation

"Give A Shift is the punny name given to an initiative intended to forward the cause of motorcycling in the U.S. market, which is showing signs of shrinkage due to a variety of reasons: demographic, cultural, and systemic.

Spearheaded by Robert Pandya, a moto industry stalwart in public relations and marketing, GAS is bringing together all interested parties to identify problems and to come up with possible solutions. All voices are desired, from newbie millennials to veteran industry personnel and stakeholders.

The first GAS conference was held last November, with a panel of 25 individuals from diverse backgrounds, including yours truly. A follow-up gathering was assembled last week.

Flattening motorcycle sales will have a profound impact on the transpo-tainment aspects of motorcycling that we’re passionate about. Baby boomers have girded the moto market for decades, but their collective influence is dying off, quite literally. For the motorcycle industry to maintain its current sales volume, particularly here in North America, we need an influx from younger generations." - Continues at link.

Offline The Cycle Guy

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #6 on: 01/18/18 07:27PM »
Here's another article on the topic...

http://www.motorcycle.com/features/give-a-shift-trying-to-help-save-the-motorcycle-industry.html

Give A Shift: Trying To Help Save The Motorcycle Industry
Kickstarting a needed conversation

"Give A Shift is the punny name given to an initiative intended to forward the cause of motorcycling in the U.S. market, which is showing signs of shrinkage due to a variety of reasons: demographic, cultural, and systemic.

Spearheaded by Robert Pandya, a moto industry stalwart in public relations and marketing, GAS is bringing together all interested parties to identify problems and to come up with possible solutions. All voices are desired, from newbie millennials to veteran industry personnel and stakeholders.

The first GAS conference was held last November, with a panel of 25 individuals from diverse backgrounds, including yours truly. A follow-up gathering was assembled last week.

Flattening motorcycle sales will have a profound impact on the transpo-tainment aspects of motorcycling that we’re passionate about. Baby boomers have girded the moto market for decades, but their collective influence is dying off, quite literally. For the motorcycle industry to maintain its current sales volume, particularly here in North America, we need an influx from younger generations." - Continues at link.
I was at the Give A Shift forum last week at Lucky Wheels Garage (cool place, by the way).  It was certainly interesting, seeing old moto-industry friends and meeting new ones too.  The meeting was surprisingly short on suggestions for action.  After the speakers were done we all chatted, and I asked several people for their ideas about how we can help stimulate new ridership.

The general consensus was that several factors are hurting motorcycle sales.  Economic, practical, and safety are the big ones.  With high rents, student loan debt, and relatively low wages, younger people don't have the funds for an expensive toy.  They feel they can afford only 1 vehicle, and you can carry a whole lot more stuff in a car.

Some felt that any solution should come from the manufacturers, after all its in their economic interest.  I agree with that to a point, however I think the OEMs are doing a decent job with products to attract new riders.  Most of the manufacturers have small, relatively affordable and relatively unintimidating bikes these days.

Offroad riding legend Scot Harden has proposed a solution involving people, not products.  His "Plus 1" initiative suggests actions we can all take to help increase ridership.  Here's the entire article:  http://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Home/News-Story/advocating-for-motorcyclings-future

Here are some of Scot's suggestions:
1. Share your passion with others. Expose non-motorcycle friends to the sport by inviting them to your house to catch the Sunday game on TV. Entertain in your garage. Use your motorcycle(s) as props to promote discussion about motorcycles. Let them touch, feel, even sit on your bike. I would argue that every motorcyclist started a love affair with motorcycling after first sitting on someone else’s bike.

2. Attend an event. Invite your non-motorcyclist friends to a motorcycle show, race or rally. Take time to explain what is going on, introduce them to your motorcycling friends, and share the experience with them like you would anyone else.

3. Take a friend for a ride. It doesn’t have to be all day. Take them to lunch or for coffee. Let them experience the fun and enjoyment of riding.

4. Teach someone how to ride. I know this raises all sorts of issues, but many enthusiasts—like myself—have enough property and small-displacement bikes to teach people how to ride off road. Get them over their initial fears. Show them it isn’t as complicated as it looks. Encourage them to take a rider-training course.

5. Invite your non-motorcycle friends for dinner and a movie. I suggest a motorcycle movie, such as “The World’s Fastest Indian,” the “Long Way Around,” “The Motorcycle Diaries,” “On Any Sunday” or “Take it to the Limit.” Anything to inspire them to want to give motorcycling a try.

6. Share the experience. Tell your co-workers about your latest motorcycle trip or adventure. Sure, they probably already know you’re a motorcyclist. But have you ever shared exactly what that means and how it enriches your life? This would work well in any other groups or associations you are already involved in.

7. Invite non-motorcycle friends to go camping with you and experience the outdoors. Find a place where you can all enjoy the surroundings and make sure you have your motorcycle available, as well. My first motorcycle riding experience took place on just such a trip.

8. Visit your local motorcycle dealer and invite your non-motorcycling buddy to tag along. Show off the great product offerings. Make the point that motorcycles exist in all shapes and sizes.

9. Target social media. Share pictures of yourself enjoying the sport. Share posts you come across that are inspiring and show just how much fun motorcycling is.

10. Reach out to millennials. For all you baby boomers out there, make an effort to reach out to your children’s friends and acquaintances. Show an interest in what they are doing. Ask them if they’ve ever thought of going riding. If you can, provide an opportunity for them to experience the sense of freedom, adventure and excitement that motorcycling offers.




Offline Snapshot

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #7 on: 01/19/18 06:16AM »
What Scot said above.  We do need to start reaching out to others.

Ride on,

J~
« Last Edit: 01/19/18 05:04PM by Snapshot »
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Offline breakdirt916

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #8 on: 01/19/18 01:40PM »
 :44:You have a property big enough to ride a small bike?!?

Want to sell it? LOL

My duplex may support an electric bike mini track around the whole perimeter...but honestly open parking lots are better
« Last Edit: 01/19/18 01:42PM by breakdirt916 »
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Offline luciano136

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #9 on: 01/19/18 01:40PM »
Safety/fear is probably one of the big drivers in the US.  Unless parents ride themselves, they will discourage kids to ride at all cost because it's too dangerous.  When you get older and make your own decisions, most everyone will disapprove of riding as soon as you have kids; they find it "irresponsible" and "selfish". 
Well, your last option is to wait until kids are out of the house but by that time, the desire to ride is probably long gone...

Unless that mindset changes, I feel like only old farts and a few selected rebels will continue riding.  Just look at this forum, most everyone is gone LOL


Offline calamari

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #10 on: 01/19/18 03:49PM »
Wow, I think Scot hit it on the head. The OEMs can only do so much (at great cost) to offer brand new machines designed for this next new market. I agree that it does fall on us the enthusiasts to keep this fire going. Spreading/sharing the passion must be part of this communal experience to ensure we don't all end up on self driving Burgman 650's (no offense).

FYI, the Yamaha TTR125L is the absolute best motorcycle to introduce new riders to the joys of tow wheels. I have 3 TTRs and within the last year have roped a handful of otherwise uninterested non riders to try them out, two of these people have since purchased their first motorcycles (one new, and one used).


Offline r0ckrat

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #11 on: 01/20/18 01:41PM »
One thing that hasn't gotten much attention is the role the dealer plays. Lots of people walk into to dealers with a passing interest, and leave thinking that it's too expensive. Dealers need to work on their sales people to get that first sale so that there will be a later sale. The sales guys often focus on the expensive, high profit margin options rather than working to make an interested party into a longtime rider and purchaser. So they might get one sale that has a high return, but then that buyer scares themselves, sells the bike never to return. If the dealers would work more on getting people onto the smaller displacements to start, and getting them into education courses, then there would be greater numbers tha would return to that dealership for bigger bikes later.

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #12 on: 01/20/18 02:40PM »
Here's another article with a different take from the folks at Revzilla...

https://www.revzilla.com/common-tread/what-i-plan-to-do-in-2018-for-the-good-of-motorcycling

What I plan to do in 2018 for the good of motorcycling

I wish we were on the cusp of a thriving era for the industry and for ridership, yet all the data indicate we are not in the midst of a Golden Age of motorcycling in the United States.

What’s a rider to do? It’s not likely an individual can favorably sway the employment environment of an entire country. I can't easily alter income inequality, snowy weather, or the price of gasoline. However, I’m confident there are things an individual person can do to promote a healthy, growing motorcycle climate in the United States. Here are some things I plan to do in 2018.

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #13 on: 01/21/18 09:08AM »
If the dealers would work more on getting people onto the smaller displacements to start,

I think this is valid but there are mental barriers that make this challenging for the dealer.

how many times do we see a post of "hi i'm a new rider, just got my license, what liter bike should I buy?  I don't want a 250/300/whatever because I heard i'd get bored and if I don't want a 600 because I want a bike to grow into."

and then people facilitate that by agreeing!

blows my mind. 


I can't find it now, but I seem to recall the import fees on small displacement bikes is the same(?) as midsize bikes which makes them less profitable.  Any of you who've travelled outside the US, how many small cc bikes did you see?  tons right? all over. 50's, 125's, 150's, etc etc.


so how do we fix it?  motorcycles in America are a luxury.  in most of the rest of the world they're someone's first mode of transportation because they don't take up much space and they're relatively inexpensive to buy, own, and operate. 

So how do make that happen here?  the import and emission controls of small cc bikes needs to be reevaluated. insurance rates for motorcycles are disproportionate to a car of the same value.  cities should prioritize motorcycle parking.  businesses should encourage moto-commuting with incentives or subsidies. 

my ideas at least.

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #14 on: 01/22/18 09:53AM »
so how do we fix it?  motorcycles in America are a luxury.  in most of the rest of the world they're someone's first mode of transportation because they don't take up much space and they're relatively inexpensive to buy, own, and operate. 

Perhaps the only way to make motorcycling more affordable for newer riders is to lower accident statistics for these riders which will reduce insurance premiums.  It could be done with two approaches: Make MSF courses mandatory prior to issuing a license, and adopt a tiered licensing system.  First 2 years, limit displacement to 500cc's or less, and from there create a mid-tier or unrestrict the size requirement after that. 

So how do make that happen here?  the import and emission controls of small cc bikes needs to be reevaluated. insurance rates for motorcycles are disproportionate to a car of the same value.  cities should prioritize motorcycle parking.  businesses should encourage moto-commuting with incentives or subsidies. 

I doubt emissions restrictions will be relaxed especially considering unhealthy air is a hot-button issue, and global warming/climate change is become more and more evident every day.  As for businesses, or more specifically employers, encouraging moto-commuting, until the risk-level can be drastically reduced, won't be the type of liability any business would want to shoulder.  Designating more motorcycle parking in office parking lots, however, can be done very cheaply.

My thought for making motorcycling inclusive, in addition to the above, especially to newer riders is to market it at venues catering to youth.  Have a vendor booth set-up at a popular concert and make it an experience.  California Superbike School had a booth set up at the IMS this year, and it was fun sitting on the racing simulator and getting tips on body positioning.  It's one thing to preach or hand out flyers, but if you can make it interactive that may be enough to pique one's interest, especially the uninitiated.   
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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #15 on: 01/22/18 12:28PM »
The surest way to attract younger riders into the fold is to give them room in their paychecks to afford bikes and gear in the first place.  Start by lowering rent.  That's not going to happen any time soon in California.  If they can't afford rent they sure as heck ain't going to afford a bike payment.  Most folks in their early 20's probably take home $3k/mo or less if that.  If half that goes to rent and car payment, well, not much left for anything else.  Unlike 20 years ago, today's young adults spend a lot more on their Iphones, cars, & rent.

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #16 on: 01/22/18 12:45PM »
The surest way to attract younger riders into the fold is to give them room in their paychecks to afford bikes and gear in the first place.  Start by lowering rent.  That's not going to happen any time soon in California.  If they can't afford rent they sure as heck ain't going to afford a bike payment.  Most folks in their early 20's probably take home $3k/mo or less if that.  If half that goes to rent and car payment, well, not much left for anything else.  Unlike 20 years ago, today's young adults spend a lot more on their Iphones, cars, & rent.

 :1:

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Re: US Moto Industry news...
« Reply #17 on: 01/22/18 01:36PM »
The surest way to attract younger riders into the fold is to give them room in their paychecks to afford bikes and gear in the first place.  Start by lowering rent.  That's not going to happen any time soon in California.  If they can't afford rent they sure as heck ain't going to afford a bike payment.  Most folks in their early 20's probably take home $3k/mo or less if that.  If half that goes to rent and car payment, well, not much left for anything else.  Unlike 20 years ago, today's young adults spend a lot more on their Iphones, cars, & rent.

That partially explains slow sales in California, but in places like Florida, the average rent is only 10% higher than the national average.  Plus, they have no state income tax, and food costs are relatively low compared to the rest of the nation. 

The easy way to make rent affordable = roommates.  As mentioned earlier, make the insurance premiums affordable for newer riders and the take rate would probably be higher.   
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