Topic: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette  (Read 2516 times)

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Offline VFRCapt.Bob

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Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« on: 03/22/18 07:54AM »
Rogue brought up a subject about getting the attention of a slower rider while lanesharing and communicating to him your want to pass. I would like to amend my position on this as i was wrong headed in my response. Kind of an ass about it too.
Had my experience with the mad tailgating honking and generally rude Harley rider which changed my mind. If confronted by anybody like this, simply put your ego in check and let him know you see him now and safely move over as soon as you safely can.
I will add to this that when ever you have a chance while safely lanesplitting check your rearview mirrors one at a time to see if a motorcycle is behind you and approaching. This is tricky in stop and go traffic because you don't want to lose you forward situational awareness. I call it the chameleon glance. I turn my head slightly to best use my peripheral vision forward as I quickly look in my mirror right forward then left forward. It has become a natural and good habit.
Case in point. Torrance PD motorcycle cop lives in my neighborhood and we work roughly the same hours. He is a hell of a good rider and we have a bit of good fun hotdogging the Seal Beach exit and on ramps with some nice lean angle. While splitting to work he often gains on me from behind and I usually see him before he puts his headlights in my right hand mirror. I now call that the "hello I want to pass now move." I simply move to my left, in carpool lane so no crossing over the double yellows, and he passes and vanishes into the distance. 
I learn from moto cops. They ride all day while I just ride to work then back in comparison. So why would I treat a fellow rider any different?
In conclusion, if you want to pass a slower rider I suggest you park on his outside right, aim your lights in his right hand mirror perhaps even flash a quick high beam on off and wait a few moments before repeating. Try this instead of getting all horny. Law states horn is to be used to avoid an accident only. So using it comes off as rude. Law states that a vehicle behind you flashing his high beams whishes to pass. When it is safe to move over and allow him to pass. A good motorcycle rider should check his mirrors regularly and never seek to aggravate the vehicle behind him. At this point slowing down and brake checking makes you the instagator in a road rage incident.
I ride everyday, rain or shine and this has been on my mind for a while during those rides. Wanted to get it off my chest since I have been wrong about this before. Ride safe out there.
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Offline 1fastrider

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #1 on: 03/22/18 08:55AM »
Totally agree people need to check mirrors.  The times I get frustrated is when bikes has bar end mirrors or have them where it makes no difference what lane position I get into I can't seem to get their attention.  I used to get stuck on the way home behind a couple cruiser riders and 3 to 5 of us would get backed up behind them.  They never checked mirrors and they would pass big open spots to let us by but that didn't matter.  This meant people got annoyed after a couple miles and would go split between the other lanes to get around.  I actually think one of those guys did it on purpose as if to say he's doing it safely and I'm gonna make you all do the same but it just made people do more dangerous things to get around.
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Offline luciano136

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #2 on: 03/22/18 09:03AM »
I lane split the 405 every day as well and here are my 2 cents in case anyone cares LOL:

* If you are the slower rider, I agree that you should check your rear view mirrors and let the rider behind you pass as soon as you can move out of the way in a safe manner;
* If you are the faster rider, it's up to you to make a safe pass or simply wait till the slower rider pulls over.  I don't think you should tailgate, flash lights or honk horns because you may force the rider in front to do a dangerous move just to get out of the way.  I'm usually patient, keep a little distance and eventually they see me and will move out of the way.

On another note, looks like a bike got hit yesterday morning between 8 and 8:30 around Atlantic exit.  No sign of the rider by the time I got there; hope he/she is fine!!

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #3 on: 03/22/18 12:17PM »
Couldn't agree more check mirrors often and let people past as soon as safe.

A lot of people treat perceive the people slowing them down are being rude and do anything to make them move over.
This may or may not be true but obsessively flashing your lights honking your horn just gets you pissed off and ruins your ride. Most often people are rude back and tailgate unsafely while doing the above or not just tailgate. This is rudeness (and dangerous) to fight rudeness (with the possibility of road rage tossed in) make no sense to me. If you have somebody over for dinner and your guest belches do you get up and answer this rudeness by farting in their face? Why not rudeness for rudeness. Maybe you just go strait to a beat down, table rage to settle the mater.

I don't think people see other cars as having a real life human behind the wheel. I think people just see cars as obstacles that have to be navigated around. Remember they are people maybe tired, thinking about work or family, maybe they are dealing with problems, could be they are really just assholes. Why not give the benefit of doubt and treat them like people and give a little slack, could cost you 30 seconds of time but hay at least you were doing the human thing.

I'll step off my soap box now.   
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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #4 on: 03/22/18 12:48PM »
In my personal experience, most riders will let you by if they see you back there itching to pass.  But there will ALWAYS be someone who will not let you by.  There are plenty of people out there, mostly in cars, who have no problem holding everyone back because they feel entitled to their space because in their minds, if you want to go faster then you are a danger to society!  Everyone slower then me is a wuss and anyone faster than me is an asshole!  LOL! 

Just this weekend on Live Oak Canyon, I caught up to some dude driving a little shit-box, going pretty slow in the corners.  I waited for a safe place to pass him on my DR650, and when that opportunity appeared I passed him.  Didn't buzz him.  Didn't cut him off.  Didn't flash my lights nor honk my horn.  I got to Cook's corner to wait for Breakdirt and the dude caught up to me a few minutes later and he was pissed off I passed him.  He felt he was going at a safe pace so everyone should not go any faster than him. 

You gotta watch out for these old people who get offended easily.  [wink-wink]

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #5 on: 03/22/18 01:17PM »
Rogue I'd bet my lunch money while you waited for your chance to pass you sat on his bumper probably 12 feet behind him. He may have been a total ass wipe but maybe just maybe you helped him get pissed off ?
"The ride IS the destination..." OOTV

If at first you don't succeed, chuck it all in and go for a ride!

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #6 on: 03/22/18 01:57PM »
12 feet is 1.5x the length of a parking spot. Thatís normal following distance around here. Regardless, people have the right to go slow if they want to. And I have the right to pass them. Live and let live right?  Itís a two way street. If people get pissed off with such a move they need to stop driving in SoCal!

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #7 on: 03/22/18 03:15PM »
Sorry everybody else dose it so its alright is not an excuse, my father taught me that when I was 8 and wanted to steal a bike when mine got stolen. 12 feet is being a complete asshole weather everybody else dose it or not (they don't). Saying get the f out of my way by riding his ass is not live and live. 2 wrongs never make a right just make 2 people pissed off instead of one.

I drive for a living and see the kind of thing everyday, I'm not completely innocent often getting pissed or pissing others off. I am human and so is everybody else in a car or on a bike. I just try to think about that before I escalate one way or the other.
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If at first you don't succeed, chuck it all in and go for a ride!

"If someone doesnít value evidence, what evidence are you going to provide to prove that they should value it?"
"If someone doesnít value logic, what logical argument could you provide to show the importance of logic?"
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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #8 on: 03/22/18 04:14PM »
Dude, I wasnít riding his ass!! Geezus!

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #9 on: 03/22/18 08:24PM »
You said you were and I couldn't count the times I've seen you do just that. But if you weren't I apologize. Lodgic dictates simply getting passed is not enough to get one upset but the manner in which one gets passed can be.
"The ride IS the destination..." OOTV

If at first you don't succeed, chuck it all in and go for a ride!

"If someone doesnít value evidence, what evidence are you going to provide to prove that they should value it?"
"If someone doesnít value logic, what logical argument could you provide to show the importance of logic?"
Sam Harris

Offline VFRCapt.Bob

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #10 on: 03/23/18 07:06AM »
Easy boys. I enjoy a good discussion. Point is people get annoyed pretty easily. It's usually a manner of perception. Another person's  state of mind is not in our area of control. If you hang back too far the message is that you have no desire to pass. Everybody has varying levels of patience. I can only enjoy riding someone elses pace for so long. Maybe flashing the high beams goes too far.
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Offline 1fastrider

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #11 on: 03/23/18 06:15PM »
Need to find a way to mount a launcher of some sort to fire projectiles that get the attention of slow people so I don't have to wheelie past them while laying on the horn. the extra attention to that horn could be dangerous.
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Offline paul13131313

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #12 on: 03/23/18 08:51PM »
I thought flashing your lights was " MOVE OVER NOW, BECAUSE I'M APPROACHING TWO HUNDRED MPH!" on the autobahn in Germany. Never heard of that signal here in the states? That behavior just annoys me, you know, one step down from horn honking.

I had a car honk his horn behind me all the way across ACH to Wrightwood, when I still owned a car. I think it was my passengers drinking buddies and him playing games.

I commute everyday and when I come up on someone I just go around on the other side of the lane. I lane split at such a pace that, if you're faster than me, I trust you to do the same, unless your a policeman with blue lights, siren and on your way to a doughnut, otherwise, the lanes all yours when I exit it. Otherwise, what happens is a race to see who can stay in front. If your pulling away from me going 80, fine. If I move 5 to 10 mph faster than traffic, fine. If you pass me when the space is 3 feet wide on your dresser, fine. If you have to slow/stop because the space is now 2 feet wide and I can pass thru on my 18 inch wide bike on the other side of the vehicles and, move back in front, fine. Just accept the skills and physics of the situation and ride your ride as I ride mine. You're bouncing off the rev limiter,honking horn and thumping V-twin, one bike length behind, don't concern me. I'm focused on the 5,000 to 80,000 pound vehicles in front of me that open they're doors, cross double yellows/lane limit lines, u-turn from the right hand lane,etc. You have one to multiple lanes to pass, to the right or left and, jump ahead.

I am annoyed by the rider that just has to get in front to prove they can! The question is do you have the skills/pace to stay in front. Once again the passing each other scenario. I get this on my commute. The only way to prove they're superior is crossing a line, speeding, running a light or a desperate close call move on they're part endangering, themselves or others. 
And don't start accusing me of lack of patience. I obey the double yellow & white line: I rode behind two full dressers across ACH for twenty miles before the one in the left side of the lane pulled over and motioned me by.
Once again, I suggest what I was told long ago when riding through the mountain curves: Ride your own pace. Don't try to keep up with the more skilled riders or you will soon find yourself beyond yours. If your pace is up to the skilled riders, you will keep up with and pass.
(Pssst! Do you know why policeman go to donut shops? That's where they use the bathroom! Thank you Traffic School.)
« Last Edit: 03/23/18 09:05PM by paul13131313 »

Offline paul13131313

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #13 on: 03/23/18 09:58PM »
Now, as to cars/trucks/other vehicles.
You're "sharing lanes on a motorcycle at 5-10 mph faster than traffic" and mile (s) away from the vehicles when you started.
I suggest these behaviors toward four to eighteen wheel vehicle.

Riding at this pace, with your high beams on, gives them plenty of time to notice and react to your presence.

If a car wants to change lanes, by signaling or not, or any other move, stupid or not, go the extra mile by slowing down and letting them complete the maneuver (Remember, your mile(s) ahead of traffic already!)

Yielding and courteousnes pay future dividends for you and other riders . They see you coming and move over to let you by, sometimes one after the other!

Califonia has a Watch Out For Motorcyclists day every year and I credit this for much of the courteousnes vehicles are showing in general lately!

Decisively passing vehicles and not cruising one mph faster in they're blind spots, puts them and you in danger of an almost sure collision. You want to be seen, stay in sight.

DO NOT RESPOND TO ROAD RAGE! The finger, hand gestures and the evil eye stare do not work. I've mistakenly tried them all. Now, I just split lanes and leave them behind. It's as easy as that. If all else fails, head for a police station and show them the video!
Of course, the GoPro Session's  I have mounted front and rear on my helmet, do help me greatly in the "I did'nt see him" /insurance scenario. Also, police will make instant right turns at intersections and move over four lanes on the freeway to get away from them! The meter maid will still heartily wave though when she spots them.

And, sadly, last but not least: If vehicles are cutting you off, turning in front of you, pulling out in front of you and stopping short in front of you, I suggest you look where I found the problem myself. In the mirror!
 I ride a vehicle that accelerates faster, stops faster and, turns faster than anything on the road and I'm annoyed that everyone's in the way! Until my first collision. Insurance doesn't pay for stupid.
And I was just pissing off the public, as in the scenario at the convenience store when the "public" wants to know if all motorcyclists "zoom up along side me, pull in front, brake and then, turn right at the next intersection. Do they all do this?"
Ride safe and at your own pace. Remember, you're invisible unless you're not!
« Last Edit: 03/24/18 09:30PM by paul13131313 »

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #14 on: 03/23/18 10:28PM »
I was splitting on the 405 today 15 seconds behind another rider both within guidelines. The rider in front of me gestured to several cars that they should move over and let motorcycles by (no finger or other insult) about the 4th car he did this to moved over to block me. Not so sudden to cause harm but block me. I paid the price for his actions.
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Offline 1fastrider

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #15 on: 03/24/18 10:36AM »
I get that quite a bit. some rude biker isn't let over by a car quickly enough and finally gets by revving the engine, flipping the bird (never understood why that's a thing) and even hitting their mirror.  Of course the next person gets the angry behavior (me) so I try to back off and not follow to close to guys like that
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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #16 on: 03/24/18 10:42AM »
On a positive note: Can we give a wave, thumbs up, etc for the drivers that do move over when splitting?  I've been behind some riders that seem to have lost this gesture of "thanks".  I give a peace sign when safe as it's nice when someone both sees you and makes an effort to make splitting easier.
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Offline BOXER

Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #17 on: 03/24/18 10:51AM »
Two things I'd like to respond to.
One is using your high beam.  It's aggravating to be blinded by someone following you with their high beam on.  It also makes it difficult to determine their distance behind you.
Two, following too close makes you invisible behind my bike (FJR).  I check my mirrors constantly but if you follow in my blind spot your endangering both of us.  Hang back a little with your low beam on please.
Carry on.

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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #18 on: 03/24/18 04:52PM »
I try to wave whenever it's safe to do so. 
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Re: Lanesplitting aka Lanesharing etiquette
« Reply #19 on: 03/24/18 06:26PM »
Two things I'd like to respond to.
One is using your high beam.  It's aggravating to be blinded by someone following you with their high beam on.  It also makes it difficult to determine their distance behind you.
Two, following too close makes you invisible behind my bike (FJR).  I check my mirrors constantly but if you follow in my blind spot your endangering both of us.  Hang back a little with your low beam on please.
Carry on.

People don't understand that some people are more sensitive to bright light than they may be. It can be dangerous to be blinded by bright lights. This is why it is against the law, not to mention rude and selfish drive with your brights on around other cars or bikes.
Please people don't do it.
"The ride IS the destination..." OOTV

If at first you don't succeed, chuck it all in and go for a ride!

"If someone doesnít value evidence, what evidence are you going to provide to prove that they should value it?"
"If someone doesnít value logic, what logical argument could you provide to show the importance of logic?"
Sam Harris

 

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