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Topics - bkrochman

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1
28-Year-Old Man Dies in Fall During ‘Illegal’ Motorcycle Stunt on 15 Freeway in Corona: CHP

http://ktla.com/2017/07/17/28-year-old-man-dies-in-fall-during-illegal-motorcycle-stunt-on-15-freeway-in-corona-chp/

Quote
A rider was killed Sunday after he stood on his motorcycle during an illegal stunt on the 15 Freeway in Corona and tumbled onto the road, officials said.

Leslie Elliott, a 28-year-old Garden Grove resident, was pronounced dead at Corona Regional Medical Center, according to the Riverside County coroner’s bureau.

Elliott was one of 20 to 30 members of the motorcycle group, Ruthless Ryderz, who were riding on the northbound 15 Freeway near Weirick Road just before 10 a.m., according to the California Highway Patrol.

The group was causing traffic woes on the freeway as members slowed and blocked motorists so that riders “could perform illegal stunts on the freeway,” CHP Sgt. Nathan Baer said in a statement

Go Fund Me account here:
https://www.gofundme.com/leslie-elliotts-ruthless-hatter

2
From Stu News:
http://www.stunewsnewport.com/

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NBPD to focus on motorcycle safety Saturday

As part of our grant-funded Special Traffic Enforcement and Crash Prevention (STEP) activities, the Newport Beach Police Department will be conducting a specialized Motorcycle Safety Enforcement Operation on Saturday, June 24.

Extra officers will be on duty patrolling areas that are frequented by motorcyclists and where recent traffic collisions have occurred, in an effort to reduce injuries. Education and enforcement will be targeted at drivers and motorcycle riders alike. The officers will be focused on specific offenses including driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, speeding, driving on a suspended or revoked license, violations of motorcycle license endorsement, and any other dangerous activities.

Motorcycle fatalities have risen dramatically in California, showing a 28% increase over the decade low of 352 in 2010. In 2013, 453 motorcyclists lost their lives, marking the highest number of deaths in the previous five years. California collision data shows that the primary causes of motorcycle-involved collisions include speeding, unsafe turning, and driver/rider impairment due to drugs or alcohol.

During the past two years in the City of Newport Beach, 66 persons were injured in traffic collisions involving motorcycles, but none of these collisions involved a fatality. The Police Department remains dedicated to preventing traffic-related deaths and injuries.

Funding for these Safety Operations is provided by a grant from the California Office of Traffic and Safety through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

3
Misc / June 2nd Car Show, Bands, Beer Garden, and Food
« on: 05/31/17 01:17PM »
Hey everyone,

If you are looking for something fun to do this weekend there is an event in Costa Mesa that you should check out.

The LIONS Club is hosting its 70th annual Fish Fry and Carnival. I know that doesn't sound awesome, but check out the entertainment! Live Bands, A Car Show Friday Evening, food and drinks. More details here at their website:

http://www.cmnhlions.com/fish-fry/entertainment-schedule/






4
If anyone is looking for someplace fun to head out to tonight for a good gearhead cause, check out the Gears and Beers fundraiser at Stereo Brewery on March 2nd from 6-10pm, 950 S Vía Rodeo, Placentia, CA 92870.

Gears and Beers

Hello friends, family, sponsors,
and team members of CSUF Formula SAE
 
We would like to invite you to our second fundraiser this year at Stereo Brewery on March 2nd from 6-10pm. For the duration of the fundraiser, $2 of every pint ordered will go directly to the Formula SAE program. This means more parts, materials, and a new faster, lighter car. Stereo Brewery is located in Placentia and is a family friendly place, so please stop by, grab a pint, and have fun! If you aren't able to make it, please consider a donation. For more information: https://www.facebook.com/events/1088923254550350/

5
Heads-up peeps!

Quote
12/6/2016
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
   PRESS RELEASE #120616
Subject :

   NBPD Announces Operation Focusing on Motorcycle Safety
Contact :   Jennifer Manzella, Press Information Officer    949-644-3662
    jmanzella@nbpd.org

As part of our grant-funded Special Traffic Enforcement and Crash Prevention (STEP) activities, the Newport Beach Police Department will be conducting a specialized Motorcycle Safety Enforcement Operation on Friday, December 9.

Extra officers will be on duty patrolling areas that are frequented by motorcyclists and where recent traffic collisions have occurred, in an effort to reduce injuries. Education and enforcement will be targeted at drivers and motorcycle riders alike. The officers will be focused on specific offenses including driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, speeding, driving on a suspended or revoked license, violations of motorcycle license endorsement, and any other dangerous activities.

Motorcycle fatalities have risen dramatically in California, showing a 28% increase over the decade low of 352 in 2010. In 2013, 453 motorcyclists lost their lives, marking the highest number of deaths in the previous five years. California collision data shows that the primary causes of motorcycle-involved collisions include speeding, unsafe turning, and driver/rider impairment due to drugs or alcohol.

During the past two years in the City of Newport Beach, one person died and 91 others were injured in traffic collisions involving motorcycles. The Police Department remains dedicated to preventing traffic-related deaths and injuries. We encourage everyone on the road to stay alert and aware of your surroundings, especially when turning or changing lanes. Whether you are on two wheels – or on four – it’s your responsibility to safely share the road.

Safety tips for motorcycle riders: See and be seen

    Use your lane position to increase visibility; change lanes only when there is ample room
    Match your speed to surrounding traffic
    Always wear a DOT-compliant helmet and brightly-colored protective clothing
    Ride with lights on, even during daylight hours

Safety tips for drivers: Share the road

    Look twice for motorcyclists, especially when entering the roadway, turning, or changing lanes
    Remember that motorcyclists are allowed in HOV lanes, unless prohibited by signage

Funding for these Safety Operations is provided by a grant from the California Office of Traffic and Safety through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

http://www.nbpd.org/civica/press/display.asp?layout=12&Entry=602

6
Good short piece from Bike Bandit:

http://www.bikebandit.com/blog/post/7-things-emts-wish-you-knew-about-motorcycle-accidents

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Being in a motorcycle accident, or coming onto the scene of one, can be a confusing and even terrifying experience. Emergency personnel like EMTs are trained to handle situations like that, but there are a few simple things you can do to make their jobs a lot easier, and improve the chances that lives will be saved. Check them out here, and share them with your friends!

Seven Things EMT's Wish You Knew About Motorcycle Accidents
1) Survey the Scene, and Make Sure It's Safe

When you're first or early on the scene of a motorcycle accident, you may come up on a scene that's very disturbing and confusing, and your first instinct will probably be to dive in and help the injured rider or riders. But by doing that, you could be putting yourself in danger too - stopping in the middle of the road could expose you to other passing vehicles, spilled fuel could catch on fire, and exposing yourself to body fluids could infect you with something you don't know the injured person has.

Nobody will benefit from having another person get injured by trying to help someone who already was - so always make sure the scene is safe for you before getting involved! If you can, help make it safe - move yourself or the injured person away from spilled fuel and out of the roadway, so the scene doesn't become even worse. That way, when EMT's come on the scene, they can focus only on saving lives, rather than clearing the scene of hazards.

 
2) Call 911 First

Whenever a medical emergency occurs, time is of the absolute essence. No matter where an accident happens, it will take some time for emergency personnel to arrive, so your job is to make that time as short as possible. No matter what you do on the scene, make sure that as soon as any immediate danger is clear, 911 is called immediately.

If you're the only one on the scene, you must do it before doing anything else. No matter how urgent the situation, an injured person has a better chance of survival when EMT's arrive right away. If you have company on the scene, and you often will, get someone else to call 911 while you administer first aid. If you do this, you must assign someone in particular to do it, as in "you in the yellow shirt, call 911!" Telling "someone" in general to do it does not guarantee that it will get done!

 
3) Know What First Aid To Do (And NOT To Do)

When it comes to helping out on the scene of an accident, your instinct is to help as much as you can. But in reality, unless you're professionally trained in first aid or emergency medicine, you may very well end up doing more harm than good by doing things like applying a tourniquet or doing CPR incorrectly. Generally speaking, you're better off leaving the lifesaving techniques you see on TV to the pros.

One thing anyone can and should do in a medical emergency, however, is to stop any serious bleeding by applying direct pressure to the wound. Blood is life, and the more blood someone loses, the less chance they have of survival. If you see rushing blood, apply direct pressure to the site of the wound, preferably with something clean like gauze from a medical kit.

One thing not to do is mess with the spine in any way. If someones back or neck is broken, moving it can make the damage much worse, so it is important to keep the victim's spine as stable as possible while you're helping them!

 
4) Know The Signs That You Are Hurt

We motorcycle riders tend to think we're pretty tough, and chances are, if we can get up and walk away after a motorcycle accident, we're going to think we're fine and don't need help. But that may not be the case - a lot of serious injuries can have delayed reactions that are easy to downplay at first (until it's too late!)

A few examples of these are:

**Head injuries: you can be conscious after an accident and think you're okay, but you could have a concussion or even internal bleeding that can have serious repercussions later. Any damage to your helmet, a loss of consciousness for any length of time, any vision impairment, or confusion or disorientation of any kind are warning signs of a head injury, and you should get medical attention right away.

**If it hurts to breathe deeply: this is a sign that you may have cracked a rib, and the sharp ends of broken bones can cut blood vessels or even pierce a lung, causing even worse damage.

**Swelling or pain in the abdomen: any sharp pain in the abdomen could be a sign of damage to internal organs, and swelling in the area could be a sign of internal bleeding. Both of these injuries are severe, but may take a while to notice, so if you have pain in the area from an impact during your crash, you need to get checked.

 
5) Carry a First Aid Kit

When I was in the Marine Corps, we would carry a small first aid kit attached to our flak jackets called an IFAK (Individual First Aid Kit.) We needed to keep all the combat essentials like ammo and comm equipment easily accessible to us on the front of our gear, so the IFAK was attached to our backs - where we could basically never get to them. But that's because it wasn't for you to get to at all - it was for your buddies to get to. The IFAK was full of medical supplies for other people to use on YOU if you got hurt.

The same logic can apply when you're out riding. If you carry a medical kit on your bike and come up on an accident, you can use it to save someone's life; and even if you don't know how to use everything in it, someone else might be on the scene who does.

But if you carry one and YOU are in an accident, someone else now has the tools they need to possibly save your life. Carrying a medical kit really is a win-win, and is generally a very responsible thing to do. Here is a link to a few medical kits we carry that are made specifically for riders! (Yes, it is an advertising link, but I guess that is their perk for writing the article :) : http://www.bikebandit.com/search?q=medical&qt=search)

 
6) Make ICE info accessible

ICE stands for "In Case of Emergency" information, and its absolutely critical stuff for EMTs to have if you get hurt. The essentials are things like your medications, any medication allergies you have, medical conditions you might suffer from, your blood type, and the contact information for a loved one that should be notified if you get hurt.

A lot of people carry this information on them somewhere - the problem is that it is often not somewhere that can easily be found! A lot of people have an ICE contact saved in their phone, but then their phone is locked with a code nobody else has. For this information to be of any good to anyone, it has to be found.

A few easy ways of making contact info available are: having a wallet card with all the essential info in one place (EMTs will look for it there); wearing a medical bracelet or dog tags with emergency information on it; or snapping a photo of your ICE contact and making it your phone background while you're out riding.

One way or another, think to yourself - if you dropped to the ground unconscious right now, would anyone be able to find the information they need to save your life and let your loved ones find you? If not, you have some work to do.

 
7) Don't Make Yourself Hard To Find

Emergency personnel are trained to get to the scene of an accident and administer treatment as fast as possible - but none of that helps if they can't get to you in the first place! In order to make sure you get the lifesaving treatment you need, you need to make sure you can be found - even if you happen to be unconscious.

These days, one great way to do that is with mobile phone apps. There are apps like Eat Sleep Ride which features CRASHLIGHT, a feature that uses your accelerometer to detect a motorcycle crash, and automatically sends an emergency alert to your pre-selected contacts along with your exact location if you don't deactivate it within a small time window after the crash. Think about how long it might for a passer-by to find you and contact emergency personnel when you're on a ride out in the back roads - that time could make the difference between life and death!

In addition, make sure someone always knows where you're going, what route you'll be taking, and when to expect you back (this is especially important when you're riding where traffic may never find you, like on trail rides in back country.) Another good tip for off-road rides is to leave a note on your vehicle stating where you're riding and when you'll be back; that way if authorities see your empty vehicle at a staging area and it's way past your return time, they know not only that you may be lost or hurt, but where to start looking for you.


7
From the article:

Quote
The Orange County Sheriffís Department DUI Task Force will be out in the agency's coverage area today for a specialized Motorcycle Safety Enforcement Operation aimed at lowering deaths and injuries.

"Extra officers will be on duty patrolling areas frequented by motorcyclists and where motorcycle crashes occur," the OCSD says. "Officers will be looking for violations made by drivers and riders alike that can lead to motorcycle crashes."

http://www.ocweekly.com/news/motorcycles-are-focus-of-sheriffs-pro-safety-anti-dui-operation-today-7279664#!

8
General Motorcycle Discussion / Annual Fun Ride
« on: 03/06/16 06:51PM »
Hey OCMoto Community. Take a look at this event. If you have a bike that meets the requirements, take a day to have some fun and give someone else with a motorcycle thrill!




9
Deals and Vendors / Is Del Amo in Costa Mesa closing?
« on: 11/27/15 01:05PM »
I rode by there today and there is a For Lease sign out front.

10
You probably don't remember me. I was working my way to the carpool lane after entering from Bake when I saw you coming up on me at well past what I was traveling. Let's not split hairs and just call it 80+ although I would have guessed closer to a buck.

The second thing I noticed (the first being how fast you were approaching) when you were about 200 yards back was the position of your feet. Wide out to the sides, like you were stretching or something. Odd, but I thought, "Whatever."

Then I noticed you weaving lackadaisically around vehicles in your path, including me, now, due to proximity and in relation to my speed, I am pretty confident at about a buck.

As you blew by, I noticed the reason your feet were out to the side is that you were actually sitting on your tank almost on top of your bars.

I only have one request: I commute between Bristol and Bake daily. It would be a real bummer to roll up on your splat. Please refrain from trying to kill yourself between those two points. Seriously, blood and guts gross me out.

Thanks from that guy lumbering along at about 80 on the black BMW R1200RT.

P.S. I wish you a long and healthy life! But you could help your odds considerably!

11
This may be behind a paywall, so I pasted the text below:
Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article26620264.html

Quote


By Jim Miller

jmiller@sacbee.com

California legislation that would make it clear that motorcyclists can split lanes of traffic has been tabled for the year, several weeks after it passed the Assembly with bipartisan support.

The author of Assembly Bill 51, Assemblyman Bill Quirk, D-Hayward, will continue to work with stakeholders and resurrect the bill in 2016, the second half of the Legislature’s two-year session, a spokeswoman said. The measure faced a July 17 deadline to clear its first Senate policy committee.

Lane splitting is illegal in every state but California, which does not expressly allow or prohibit the practice. An estimated 80 percent of California motorcyclists split lanes, but it remains controversial among motorists, prompting authorities to publish lane-splitting guidelines in early 2013. They pulled them back after objections that there had been no formal rule-making process.

Quirk’s bill would essentially put those guidelines into law. Motorcyclists could split lanes at speeds of no more than 50 miles per hour. They also could not drive more than 15 miles per hour faster than the vehicles around them. Bipartisan Assembly majorities backed the measure, which had Assemblyman Tom Lackey, R-Palmdale, a former California Highway Patrol officer, as a joint author.

But the measure found no fans among motorcycle groups, who called the proposal overly restrictive. There already is widespread acceptance of lane splitting in California, they said. The Personal Insurance Federation of California backed the measure, saying lane-splitting rules would help reduce injuries and improve public safety.

A May study by UC Berkeley’s Safe Transportation Research and Education Center found that, of the nearly 6,000 motorcycle accidents in California from June 2012 through August 2013, about 1,000 involved lane-splitters. Those motorcyclists were more likely to be riding during commute hours, wearing better helmets, and riding at lower speeds, according to the study.

There have been two previous attempts to regulate motorcycle lane splitting in the Golden State. Elsewhere, there have been unsuccessful efforts to allow lane-splitting in Nevada, Oregon and Texas. In Arizona, lawmakers passed a lane-splitting bill but it was vetoed.

Jim Miller: 916-326-5521, @jimmiller2


12
Funny title, but the article is interesting:

Quote
Motorcycle lane-splitting — the rush-hour time saver for bikers that enrages many drivers — may be poised for formal legalization.

California would be the first state to sanction the traffic-evading tactic, already widespread on traffic-choked freeways of Los Angeles.

The state Assembly is expected to approve the legislation as soon as Thursday, and supporters believe it will clear the Senate as well.

The measure would allow motorcycles to travel between cars at speeds up to 15 mph faster than the flow of traffic, up to a speed of 50 mph.

The bill's legislative backers cite studies showing the practice is safer than trapping bikers behind cars, which leaves them vulnerable to more serious rear-end collisions. But their proposal has riled both detractors and supporters.

“Lane-splitting is inherently dangerous,” said Thomas Freeman, a passionate opponent of the practice who said his opposition movement, hosted online at stoplanesplitting.com, has more than 1,000 members.

While some motorcyclists applauded the action, the American Motorcyclist Assn. called for even less restrictive rules.

“We don't like this bill,” said Nicolas Haris, the association's western states representative. “It goes a long way in the right direction, but it falls short.”

Lane-splitting — a common practice in European nations — has been a fuzzy topic in California. The state has never expressly forbidden or allowed it.

Technically neither legal nor illegal, the practice has had the tacit approval of the California Highway Patrol and the Department of Motor Vehicles.

Motorcycle industry veteran Bruce Steever — who commutes on the 405 Freeway and invariably lane-splits during rush hour — applauded the proposed legislation, restrictions and all.

“Those numbers make me happy,” he said of the speed limits. “There needs to be a codified law.”

The AMA's Haris, despite his organization's complaints with the bill's specific language and speed limits, said he hoped a new California law would inspire legislators in other states to adopt similar laws.

Legislative bodies in Washington, Oregon, Texas, Nevada and Tennessee have already considered, proposed or voted on lane-splitting laws. To date, none of the proposed legislation has passed.

The California bill, which has broad support, is being spearheaded by Assemblyman Bill Quirk (D-Hayward). He coauthored the measure with Tom Lackey (R-Palmdale), a former California Highway Patrol officer, and Kansen Chu (D-San Jose), who became interested in the topic after a staffer's nephew was killed while lane-splitting at high speed.

The speed limits were determined with the help of the CHP and a safety study by UC Berkeley professor Tom Rice.

That study, scheduled for public release soon, investigated 6,000 California motorcycle accidents — 1,000 of them involving lane-splitting — and concluded that legalizing the practice was safer than outlawing it, Quirk said.

“The study found that lane-splitting was safer, compared to being stopped in the traffic,” Quirk said. “Oftentimes motorcyclists would get rear-ended. Motorists just don't see them.”

The bill appears to have momentum. It passed the Assembly Transportation Committee with a vote of 13 to 1 and the Assembly Appropriations Committee by 16 to 1. It now faces a vote in the 80-member Assembly.

If it passes there, it would face a similar review and vote in the Senate.

Until recently, both the Highway Patrol and the DMV published guidelines for safe lane-splitting. But they removed the guidelines from their publications last year after opponents complained that the agencies appeared to endorse a practice that critics argued was not legal.

“The ambiguity gave riders the idea that they had a free ticket,” Lackey said. “These parameters will alert all motorists to the safe practice of lane-splitting.”

It has also been a hot-button topic. Motorcyclists view it as a special California legal loophole. But some drivers view it as a dangerous or unfair way to get ahead in traffic.

“Motorcyclists know it's not safe. They just want to get from point A to point B faster than the cars,” Freeman contended. “We have drivers who are talking on their cellphones, who are texting, who are daydreaming. And this other distraction makes it a virtual circus.”

Former Los Angeles City Council member Dennis Zine had 33 years' experience in the Los Angeles Police Department, 18 of them as a motorcycle officer. He said he himself splits lanes, at safe speeds, but thinks the principal issue with the proposed new law is ticketing a motorcyclist who is breaking it.

“Unless the pursuing officer is on a motorcycle, the officer in a patrol car cannot possibly apprehend the vehicle that is splitting lanes,” Zine said. “The bottom line is there is no law if there's no law enforcement.”






There may be a paywall...
http://www.latimes.com/business/autos/la-fi-hy-motorcycle-lanesplitting-20150528-story.html

14
Great article on an attempt to rebuild motorcycle racing in the US. Take a minute and check it out.

From the article:
Quote
“We saw there was a gap,” said Rainey, president of a Costa Mesa-based consortium of heavy hitters in motorsports who have joined forces to launch the MotoAmerica road racing series, kicking off at the Circuit of the Americas track in Austin, Texas, today. “For whatever reason, there were no Americans coming through and getting the opportunity to go into the world championship. In my era (the early ’90s) the champions, the Americans, were coming through AMA Superbike.”

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/series-657400-motoamerica-race.html

16
From the article:

Quote
The Newport Beach Police Department will have extra officers on the streets for one day next week focused on enforcing traffic laws in areas that are well-traveled by motorcyclists or where there have been recent crashes.

The operation, scheduled for Jan. 23, is designed to prevent traffic collisions involving motorcycles, according to police.

However, officers will be writing out tickets for car drivers and bikers alike.

http://www.dailypilot.com/news/tn-dpt-me-0118-motorcycle-enforcement-20150117,0,1210752.story

17
Stay safe my fellow gray riders!!

http://www.wsj.com/articles/uneasy-rider-boomer-deaths-in-motorcycle-crashes-jump-1419210199

"While older riders may be less reckless in their habits, they also are more vulnerable, said James Hedlund, a traffic-safety consultant in Ithaca, N.Y. 'Their reflexes and their vision aren’t as good as they were,' he said, and their bodies are more fragile: 'The same impact will cause more damage to a 55-year-old than a 25-year-old.'"

18
Off Topic / CHP wants you to be a snitch!
« on: 07/08/14 10:01AM »
http://www.chp.ca.gov/prog/cheaters.cgi

If your longtime neighbor has an out-of-state license plate, the California Highway Patrol wants you to turn them in.

Source: http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/CHP-Cracking-Down-on-Out-of-State-License-Plates-266159301.html#ixzz36thCL7bv
Follow us: @nbcsandiego on Twitter | NBCSanDiego on Facebook

19
​Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Motorcycle Safety Gear

This may not be that interesting for many here, but it is a link you can share with others as appropriate.

http://indefinitelywild.gizmodo.com/everything-you-ever-wanted-to-know-about-motorcycle-sa-1596858706

20
Found this on a Duc board and thought some here might find it interesting.

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